Leadership

This feature only applies to episodes with transcripts, which is a small number at this time.

Margaret Wheatley on leadership and Warriors for the Human Spirit

...'ve got to, because I know a few years ago, you published your latest book, 'Who Do We Choose To Be?' which was on the 25th anniversary of your book 'Leadership and the New Science' So where are you currently in your thinking and the work that you're doing? Margaret Wheatley: Well, one of my delights has been...more
...e doing? Margaret Wheatley: Well, one of my delights has been to be very open and attentive to what's going on in the world. Now, when I first wrote 'Leadership and the New Science', and it was published in 1992, I was as optimistic as anyone could be that all you have to do to create positive change in the w...more
...blishing that book, which was very well received, I was very well received that it's still now a classic - it's still used in many college classes on leadership. Many University programmes use it. But it didn't change the world. And from that, I realise what it takes to change people, especially those in lead...more
...ship. Many University programmes use it. But it didn't change the world. And from that, I realise what it takes to change people, especially those in leadership, which is my interest, what it takes to change them is not good ideas. There's much more going on - many more dynamics at play, most of them are call...more
...a state of wonder for this beautiful, beautiful planet and cosmos we live in, and the most recent one, 'Who do we Choose to Be?' asks the question of leaders, not whether you're going to adopt a new theory, but whether you're going to wake up to the reality of what's going on, to the complete dismissal or ...more
...smissal or attack, I would say now on life, including people. So we're dealing with organisation, so people is the focus. My own work now is to train leaders to be Warriors for the Human Spirit. And I'll go into on that detail later - but the trajectory, the arc of my work has been initially to wake people...more
...many people were so excited to have choice. So my most recent book, 'Who do we Choose to Be?', is all about choice. It's about consciously using our leadership, not to create change at the level we all aspire to, and that we all want it so desperately, but to choose how we are going to stand up for people, h...more
...andardised processes - you have to take a stand. So it's a different level - it was much more fun to present the choice as choosing a new paradigm of leadership which would give great results and engage people to now, the choices, how are we going to stand up against these times? So I just want to give the su...more
...but the subtitles are the path, which is first we have to the first subtitle is 'facing reality', we do have to face reality. The second is 'claiming leadership'. So it's a conscious decision. I'm going to be a leader for this time. And then the third is 'restoring sanity' because truly, this is a devastating...more
... first subtitle is 'facing reality', we do have to face reality. The second is 'claiming leadership'. So it's a conscious decision. I'm going to be a leader for this time. And then the third is 'restoring sanity' because truly, this is a devastatingly crazy, insane time....more
...way of being, a new way of thinking - they might be intrigued by order without control as a basic opportunity, but they're in these organisations and leaders positions where they're being driven to increased efficiencies, shortened time spans incredible levels of distraction, and work becoming more and mor...more
... doctors don't want to be doctors any longer. So we've crushed these professions by this economic greed-infused paradigm. And it is really destroying leaders as well as all possibilities. So I'm not interested in - I no longer hold the possibility that we can create change at that level of organisations o...more
... I created Warriors for the Human Spirit as a training programme which requires real dedication and diligence and a strong community, because being a leader these days is quite terrible. Even if, I mean, what I've keep saying is, the leaders who knew what to do and had great results with high participatio...more
... dedication and diligence and a strong community, because being a leader these days is quite terrible. Even if, I mean, what I've keep saying is, the leaders who knew what to do and had great results with high participation, community engagement, self organised organisation, they knew what works - even the...more
... this. I think I mean it a little bit differently. We have to change ourselves. But we have to change ourselves in order to serve more effectively as leaders. And a lot of people are just focused on, 'well, I'm just going to change myself'. My whole purpose of being right now is to create leaders who can s...more
...tively as leaders. And a lot of people are just focused on, 'well, I'm just going to change myself'. My whole purpose of being right now is to create leaders who can stay, leaders who can stay present, leaders who are not overwhelmed by anger and aggression and frustration, leaders who won't get ill and ju...more
... a lot of people are just focused on, 'well, I'm just going to change myself'. My whole purpose of being right now is to create leaders who can stay, leaders who can stay present, leaders who are not overwhelmed by anger and aggression and frustration, leaders who won't get ill and just withdraw, leaders w...more
...sed on, 'well, I'm just going to change myself'. My whole purpose of being right now is to create leaders who can stay, leaders who can stay present, leaders who are not overwhelmed by anger and aggression and frustration, leaders who won't get ill and just withdraw, leaders who will not become cynical and...more
...g right now is to create leaders who can stay, leaders who can stay present, leaders who are not overwhelmed by anger and aggression and frustration, leaders who won't get ill and just withdraw, leaders who will not become cynical and, and just disappear on us. So I'm really working with leaders and the wh...more
..., leaders who can stay present, leaders who are not overwhelmed by anger and aggression and frustration, leaders who won't get ill and just withdraw, leaders who will not become cynical and, and just disappear on us. So I'm really working with leaders and the whole concept of leadership is, are you willing...more
...ustration, leaders who won't get ill and just withdraw, leaders who will not become cynical and, and just disappear on us. So I'm really working with leaders and the whole concept of leadership is, are you willing to commit to staying - not necessarily in the same job, but staying available for what's comi...more
...ill and just withdraw, leaders who will not become cynical and, and just disappear on us. So I'm really working with leaders and the whole concept of leadership is, are you willing to commit to staying - not necessarily in the same job, but staying available for what's coming, what's needed already, the large...more
...coming, what's needed already, the large numbers of people who are beside themselves with anxiety and fear, who are suffering terribly. Those are the leaders that I'm working with. And that's the level of change that's possible....more
..., disciplined, self-sacrificing - knowing that they, whatever the hardships of the times, they want to serve. So that's the quality of shifting one's leadership opportunities, from self-interest to service is just that clear to me. And most people won't do it. So I'm not interested in masses, I haven't been i...more
...eds to be done. And those are the people that I'm supporting now. And they're growing in numbers, I must say, I speak to many people, about restoring leadership as a noble profession. And I'm finding great resonance with people who think - oh, I could use my position, my influence my power, to do meaningful w...more
... that needs doing. And I'm really heartened by the numbers of people who respond to this, this call now - a summons to 'how are you going to use your leadership?' The old ways, the old aspirations are no longer valid. We cannot change these large systems, even though we know how to do it. What the methods and...more
... stay, who've already been activists. These are not people who are suddenly getting religious about, oh, I should do something. These are experienced leaders of all ages, but with a predominance, so far, of older people and older women who want to continue to make a contribution. It's now - we're attractin...more
...e warrior community. It's true for all of us. How do we deal with these levels of grief, rage, now, frustration. Like why don't people, why don't our leaders do what needs to be done? Well, they're not going to - and so, why are so many people suffering at the hands of the greedy? And why is the planet pus...more
...em, because we are in the grips of this overbearing 1984 kind of machine of Big Brother. So we all got excited when some corporations, some corporate leaders started learning to meditate. One of them was the CEO of Monsanto. And at the time, my colleague was in a meditation group in which he was part of th...more
... know it is they know it is. So I, the where I take the principle of self organisation - very fundamentally important to me, is when I'm working with leaders, in the midst of all this destruction, you can create an island of sanity, maybe. At least you have to try. And what I mean by being an island is it ...more
... lust and aggression are kept at bay as much as possible. I've seen this happen. It requires enormous strength, courage and commitment on the part of leaders. But within that island of sanity than everything I've ever believed or written about self organisation how to motivate people, how to use participat...more
...motivation, engagement, creativity, if we can create these islands of sanity. I am finding, and let me just say one thing about sanity, I define sane leadership, as the unshakable confidence that people can be creative, generous, and kind. And the operative phrase there is can be, that's the work of leadershi...more
...eadership, as the unshakable confidence that people can be creative, generous, and kind. And the operative phrase there is can be, that's the work of leadership. So we're reintroducing, we're recreating conditions for organisation through everything the new sciences taught us. But we're recreating the conditi...more
...air here. There is despair. And I know now, because I've been doing this for years, that this will increase my motivation and dedication to work with leaders in the way I'm doing. But pushing away the world or getting seduced by hope, getting ambushed by hope - so you see something that inspires you and yo...more
...e level. But it becomes much smaller, much more immediate and direct. So my website has a lot of things on it, because this is my work now - creating leadership, this spiritual warriorship. So it's suggestive may provide some antidotes to your despair, it may increase your despair. But keep going, keep going....more

Amy Edmondson on psychological safety and the future of work

...LG: And that’s a good lead into talking about leadership because managers and leaders of course are really influential in creating that environment, that climate of psychosocial safety, or not. And my sense...more
...LG: And that’s a good lead into talking about leadership because managers and leaders of course are really influential in creating that environment, that climate of psychosocial safety, or not. And my sense is that, especially today, p...more
...ays it’s not radical. But in practice, my feeling is it’s more challenging. Perhaps because we’re not practiced in doing it. So for those managers or leaders who are thinking: “Psychological safety sounds good, but how do I do that?”, what are you finding is most helpful in terms of supporting them in that...more
...me things I think that anybody can do to create a more psychologically safe environment. But first I wanna say, you started out by saying managers or leaders and I think being a manager is an official job, someone says: “You’re a manager, you’re gonna manage those people or that process” and that’s what yo...more
...nk being a manager is an official job, someone says: “You’re a manager, you’re gonna manage those people or that process” and that’s what you do. But leaders, I think leadership is a function. Leadership is an activity that can be done by anybody. We often think of leadership as maybe even a higher level o...more
...r is an official job, someone says: “You’re a manager, you’re gonna manage those people or that process” and that’s what you do. But leaders, I think leadership is a function. Leadership is an activity that can be done by anybody. We often think of leadership as maybe even a higher level or form of management...more
...one says: “You’re a manager, you’re gonna manage those people or that process” and that’s what you do. But leaders, I think leadership is a function. Leadership is an activity that can be done by anybody. We often think of leadership as maybe even a higher level or form of management, but that’s leadership wi...more
...cess” and that’s what you do. But leaders, I think leadership is a function. Leadership is an activity that can be done by anybody. We often think of leadership as maybe even a higher level or form of management, but that’s leadership with a capital ‘L’, maybe, it’s the CEO or the business unit manager. But l...more
...n. Leadership is an activity that can be done by anybody. We often think of leadership as maybe even a higher level or form of management, but that’s leadership with a capital ‘L’, maybe, it’s the CEO or the business unit manager. But leadership with a small ‘l’ is the small things you do to make a difference...more
...p as maybe even a higher level or form of management, but that’s leadership with a capital ‘L’, maybe, it’s the CEO or the business unit manager. But leadership with a small ‘l’ is the small things you do to make a difference, to influence others… Even a subordinate can exercise leadership that makes your lif...more
...s unit manager. But leadership with a small ‘l’ is the small things you do to make a difference, to influence others… Even a subordinate can exercise leadership that makes your life at work better. So what managers can do is exercise more leadership, and exercise leadership over the culture or the climate. T...more
...rence, to influence others… Even a subordinate can exercise leadership that makes your life at work better. So what managers can do is exercise more leadership, and exercise leadership over the culture or the climate. To me, the most important thing they can do is just start out by just being more open thems...more
...s… Even a subordinate can exercise leadership that makes your life at work better. So what managers can do is exercise more leadership, and exercise leadership over the culture or the climate. To me, the most important thing they can do is just start out by just being more open themselves, being more open ab...more
...epartment and that team and this location over there all have different levels of psychological safety, in part because it’s so greatly influenced by leaders in the middle. And so the climate is something that’s a bit more ephemeral, like the weather. It’s what I feel I can do right here. And it’s gonna be...more
...ever done, it’s not gonna be done in this little group here either. But the climate can be changed overnight sometimes. Let’s say you have a new team leader — we’ve all had an experience like that — or you join a new team. Boom! Totally different climate. You absolutely feel you can roll up your sleeves a...more
...LG: That’s helpful. You mentioned before about this distinction between management and leadership and that anyone, regardless of their role, can step into leadership of some kind. And I’m thinking about in a self-managing team or organisation, it’...more
...hat’s helpful. You mentioned before about this distinction between management and leadership and that anyone, regardless of their role, can step into leadership of some kind. And I’m thinking about in a self-managing team or organisation, it’s kind of essential that people step into leadership, that it become...more
..., can step into leadership of some kind. And I’m thinking about in a self-managing team or organisation, it’s kind of essential that people step into leadership, that it becomes leaderful. What would you say are some things that if I’m a team member and I’m perhaps used to being a bit passive, or waiting for ...more
... might have. Like somebody’s a little quiet and I see it, so I recognise suddenly it’s possible for me to ask: “Hey, what’s on your mind?” And that’s leadership, because I am doing something that was voluntary to influence someone else in a positive way. The point is, decide you wanna play a bigger game and ...more
... learn from our missteps as well as from our successes. This is gonna be a learning process. Someone decides: “OK, I’d like to exercise a little more leadership at work, make a bigger difference for others, and for the task at work.” Do not expect to get it right every time. Expect to get some of it wrong and...more
...LG: It strikes me that, as you said, the systems piece and the human piece are both important, and it’s also the case that it’s not just leaders that are responsible for creating this climate of psychological safety, but it’s also about the non-leaders, if I can use that term, stepping up in a...more
...LG: Definitely. I’m curious, as someone that teaches leadership at Harvard, so you’re really with the next generation of leaders, what are you finding is increasingly important in terms of building leadership capa...more
...LG: Definitely. I’m curious, as someone that teaches leadership at Harvard, so you’re really with the next generation of leaders, what are you finding is increasingly important in terms of building leadership capacities for the teams and organisations of the future? AE: You kn...more
...ches leadership at Harvard, so you’re really with the next generation of leaders, what are you finding is increasingly important in terms of building leadership capacities for the teams and organisations of the future? AE: You know I think it’s this — I don’t know what the right word is, but the kind of emot...more
...pter parents and being praised all the time in ways that didn’t use to be as fashionable, so I worry sometimes. But I think the coming generation of leaders does recognise that the challenges that lie ahead are huge. So as long as you can get beyond the “It’s all about me” mindset, the writing is on the w...more
...all that this is gonna take everything you’ve got. And it’s not all about you, but it is all about others and I think that’s fundamentally the job of leaders is to be other-oriented, and other-focused, and not just because I wanna care for you and develop you but because, in fact, the only way great things...more
...d, and not just because I wanna care for you and develop you but because, in fact, the only way great things are gonna happen is if others follow. So leadership is about harnessing the efforts of others to accomplish great things and you can’t harness the efforts of others if you don’t know what makes them ti...more
...LG: I think that’s interesting and I guess that’s why your work is so useful, and I really hope that business schools and people who are doing leadership trainings are practising it because I think those two polarities — psychological safety, and motivation and accountability — it’s both those things, ...more
...talking long enough that you know I don’t mean a playbook like a recipe for a cake, it won’t be that kind of playbook. But if an organisation and its leaders have decided “Let’s go on a journey”, then what’s the best advice we can give them and what does that look like? What does the journey look like and ...more

Bill Fischer and Simone Cicero on Haier and the entrepreneurial organisation

... aspects? S Cicero: Well, it’s hard to just talk about one thing. For me personally, I think Haier is a special organisation probably because of the leadership that it has. Not just when you compare it with other traditional Western organisations, but also in China. This mix of thinking that Zhang Ruimin has...more
...ings. And so for me, it’s a wonderful, wonderful opportunity to talk about how you change large, complex organisations in mature industries. And the leadership. The leadership, of course is extraordinary. So those two things, I think are what differentiates. ...more
... me, it’s a wonderful, wonderful opportunity to talk about how you change large, complex organisations in mature industries. And the leadership. The leadership, of course is extraordinary. So those two things, I think are what differentiates. ...more
...L Gill: Thank you. Let’s, let’s talk a little bit about the leadership then because I mean, Zhang Ruimin has a legacy already at Haier — 35 years or so I think he’s been in the organisation — and this is now the sixth ev...more
...e’s been in the organisation — and this is now the sixth evolution or reinvention, I believe, of the organisation. So, it takes a very unique kind of leader I think, to navigate that and I’ve read and heard about him being this incredibly well-read person but he also strikes me from just the videos that I...more
...hen testing them, putting them to work right away. S Cicero: Yeah, I think one thing that I can just add on top of this is that he’s really a humble leader. I met him a few times when I was there and now with this live interview…you can smell how much he is interested in knowing and engaging with new ide...more
...this kind of cultural approach, it’s been pulling down inside of the organisation. Because when I when I was there with the Drucker Forum we had this leader there — Mr Wu if I’m not wrong (the leader of the Internet of Food project) — and it’s a huge platform connecting thousands of enterprises which are ...more
...ulling down inside of the organisation. Because when I when I was there with the Drucker Forum we had this leader there — Mr Wu if I’m not wrong (the leader of the Internet of Food project) — and it’s a huge platform connecting thousands of enterprises which are creating these vibrant product solutions to...more
...up on the stage and the first question, the first thing he did was refer to the work of Peter Drucker. And this shows me that you have these curious leaders —they’re really humble. And when you become an humble leader, you are empowered, there’s no other way because you understand that it’s not about you,...more
... was refer to the work of Peter Drucker. And this shows me that you have these curious leaders —they’re really humble. And when you become an humble leader, you are empowered, there’s no other way because you understand that it’s not about you, it’s about all the other people that engage in the managemen...more
...ad… than your personal contribution. And I think you can recognise this because at the same time, you have these teams that are so engaged with their leaders. Most of most of all, of course, Zhang Ruimin — everybody respects him. But at the same time when you see an interview and you read people saying, “W...more
...as well because there’s always a danger that we romanticise Zhang Ruimin and put him in the same camp of this slightly outdated heroic archetype of a leader. But he has this lovely phrase about creating a system where everyone can be a CEO of themselves. And I’m interested in what your experience is of le...more
...er. But he has this lovely phrase about creating a system where everyone can be a CEO of themselves. And I’m interested in what your experience is of leadership more generally at Haier and how leadership emerges. What does leadership look like elsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What ...more
...ating a system where everyone can be a CEO of themselves. And I’m interested in what your experience is of leadership more generally at Haier and how leadership emerges. What does leadership look like elsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What does that look like? Do they have leadershi...more
...can be a CEO of themselves. And I’m interested in what your experience is of leadership more generally at Haier and how leadership emerges. What does leadership look like elsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What does that look like? Do they have leadership training? Or do you design a...more
... experience is of leadership more generally at Haier and how leadership emerges. What does leadership look like elsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What does that look like? Do they have leadership training? Or do you design a system and leadership emerges? S Cicero: Well, I think th...more
...eadership emerges. What does leadership look like elsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What does that look like? Do they have leadership training? Or do you design a system and leadership emerges? S Cicero: Well, I think there is an interesting aspect, which is the constraint definiti...more
...lsewhere in the organisation? How is leadership encouraged? What does that look like? Do they have leadership training? Or do you design a system and leadership emerges? S Cicero: Well, I think there is an interesting aspect, which is the constraint definition. And there’s a lot of leadership in Haier that g...more
...gn a system and leadership emerges? S Cicero: Well, I think there is an interesting aspect, which is the constraint definition. And there’s a lot of leadership in Haier that goes through these architectural aspects. So for example, I think a lot of Zhang Ruimin’s actual leadership is an organisational design...more
...ition. And there’s a lot of leadership in Haier that goes through these architectural aspects. So for example, I think a lot of Zhang Ruimin’s actual leadership is an organisational design leadership. So he has been designing the constraints together with his board members over the years, so that his leadersh...more
...in Haier that goes through these architectural aspects. So for example, I think a lot of Zhang Ruimin’s actual leadership is an organisational design leadership. So he has been designing the constraints together with his board members over the years, so that his leadership can really flourish in the organisat...more
...adership is an organisational design leadership. So he has been designing the constraints together with his board members over the years, so that his leadership can really flourish in the organisation. So, for example, you need just three colleagues to create an enterprise. And then when you decide, your bas...more
... on. I’m curious what that journey has been like for managers because if the if the top management — even if Zhang Ruimin is the kind of progressive leader he is — if he has a COO or someone else in the top management team who is a command-and-control bureaucrat, then it’s not going to work, right? How ...more
...like a simplified version that you can apply. **So: creating micro-enterprises (profit or loss); setting leading goals (being above average and being leaders in the market, becoming the number one); and unlocking people’s potential. **This is the simplified version that you can, you can use. And of course...more
...ts — getting the surprises out of whatever happens in order to be more efficient. And what I think that the Haier model is doing is encouraging more leadership imagination throughout the organisation, not just relying on the top. But also, there’s a great deal of locality in it. So as we see, I think one of...more
...don’t know, not enough. And so, my hope is that if there’s a revolution within the workforce, it becomes one about seeking out more autonomy and more leadership. But earlier, Lisa, you mentioned…the Toyota experience in North America. And I think the Toyota experience in North America was sincerely intereste...more
...of accelerator. You end up inside of this accelerator if you are attracted by the culture. You can be out in three months or…if there is this seat of leadership in yourself, and you have an overlap with the culture, you can easily be caught in this rapidly spinning machine and become a leader and create your ...more
...this seat of leadership in yourself, and you have an overlap with the culture, you can easily be caught in this rapidly spinning machine and become a leader and create your micro-enterprise and get your enterprise to IPO in, you know, three years. Like, you know, when you think about these guys creating t...more

Frederic Laloux with an invitation to reclaim integrity and aliveness

...hugely liberating. I think there is a real cost that comes with us pushing these questions away all the time.** **Right? This cognitive dissonance of leaders and organisations whose children are marching for Fridays for Future but they’re continuing the stuff that they do and more and more I see now that t...more
...or Future but they’re continuing the stuff that they do and more and more I see now that their children, the friends of their children, look at these leaders and say, “I don’t understand.” Can we have open and honest conversations about this? And I think that the flip side of that conversation is a real ri...more
...n aliveness that comes when we finally dare to speak these things and not numb ourselves constantly, not push them them away. And I’ve certainly seen leaders who had the courage to be honest with themselves, I’ve really seen that in action. There’s an aliveness that comes, there’s something liberating abou...more
...n into the fabric of our of our economic system. And so of course, we’re not going to have any an obvious answer.” But we’re so trained, certainly as leaders, right? And so the traditional paradigm is that if you’re a leader, you should have all the answers. Otherwise, you know, why are you a leader? One ...more
...e’re not going to have any an obvious answer.” But we’re so trained, certainly as leaders, right? And so the traditional paradigm is that if you’re a leader, you should have all the answers. Otherwise, you know, why are you a leader? One of the most beautiful and inspiring examples for me is is a story o...more
...ly as leaders, right? And so the traditional paradigm is that if you’re a leader, you should have all the answers. Otherwise, you know, why are you a leader? One of the most beautiful and inspiring examples for me is is a story of Ray Anderson from from Interface. Interface, you know, for those who don’t...more
...y? And it brought up a fascinating conversation, where I asked them about their plan B. I’ve since had this conversation with quite a few people and leaders when we talk about stuff that really matters, but they don’t have an answer for you. And I think it’s such an important conversation, such a liberati...more
... excited about. And I think that the fears that we have actually never come to pass. I have a good friend in France, Nicolas Hennon, who was a young leader of a fashion brand [Kiabi] and he did amazing things. Like he pushed towards self-management, a huge push for wholeness, very deep listening… And Ki...more
... she’s really excited. But she had this great frustration after reading your book that it seems for this to really work, you need to wait for the top leader to become enlightened, and to be open to these ideas. And she was really frustrated by that and felt like if we wait for that to happen, it’s gonna t...more
...L Gill: Yeah, I think this is the shift that is so exciting to me. And it’s liberating, I imagine, for leaders, as you say, that you don’t have to have the answers to these questions. That actually, you’ll be so amazed and surprised if you’re really transparen...more
...in service to some deep yearning that we have, or some clarity around like, “I will no longer do this.” But it’s a juicy conversation I’m having with leaders. It’s like: ...more
...n and working in this kind of way and I want everyone now to be involved in making decisions” and so on…That even then a common complaint I hear from leaders is: “I gave them permission! Why is no one stepping in? Why is no one taking initiative or making decisions — do people just need to be told what to ...more
...e in our heads and an external collective component, which is all structures and systems. And so when you tell me you had this conversation with the leader, like, “I told people now, go into it, advice process, just do it, and then nothing happens!” And so maybe people just aren’t ready. Like maybe peopl...more
...L Gill: Yeah, I think that’s really useful. And I’m reminded of one of your other videos as well with the leader of a hospital, who was noticing one team, having a lot of extra capacity and other team being overworked. And I think our tendency is often especiall...more
...hospital, who was noticing one team, having a lot of extra capacity and other team being overworked. And I think our tendency is often especially for leaders to notice, okay, this isn’t happening, or here’s a problem and to try to fix it to try to help. It’s well intentioned, but often, there’s a totally d...more
...ed and their activity had come down, so they had too many nurses and other teams were crying out for support, they needed more nurses. And when this leader asked the team that was overstaffed and said to them: “You’re obviously overstaffed, so, you know, please come up with a plan” and and then after a w...more
...a possible intervention is to get representatives from these teams to talk with each other. Because, yeah, the overstaffed team can bullshit you as a leader, but they can’t bullshit the other teams, right? Like the other teams will say: “You are understaffed, and we’re in pain. We need help!” And so in th...more
...ms will say: “You are understaffed, and we’re in pain. We need help!” And so in this case, that was all that was needed. It’s a it’s a big shift for leaders, I think, to go from me solving a problem to me orchestrating the architecture for the problem to solve itself. ...more
...t exploring the emerging world of self-managing organisations and radical ways of working. Hosted by Lisa Gill, each episode features a guest thought leader or practitioner offering a unique perspective on new and innovative ways of working. Visit the Leadermorphosis podcast webpage. Listen on Spotify. S...more

Aaron Dignan on being complexity conscious and people positive

...e over and started with a blank sheet of paper and created or modified some really incredible ways to work. And we are sort of called to do that - as leaders, founders, managers, team members. We're called to change the way we work. So that's the core concept of it. It obviously, gets into the nitty gritt...more
... keep our heads down. We're just pushing through to the next thing. Another part of this, of course, is that there's a big ego component to this and leaders and founders and managers have a lot of their identity wrapped up in being the hero or being the micromanager being the detail-oriented one or being ...more
...it's the aquarium. And I think that this chameleon nature that we talked about earlier is part of this. So yeah, if I want you to be a more inclusive leader, I could talk your ear off about it. And we could do a lot of coaching or even therapy, and we could get really deep, I could do unconscious bias tra...more
...time, and I don't think you can have one without the other. I think it is a chicken and egg problem. In many cases, you can't start the work until a leader has had some awakening and realise they want to share power. And that often comes from personal work from a walkabout or some personal crisis. So tha...more
...Lisa Gill: Yes, for sure. And what about your own personal perspective? Because, you know, you're a founder and a leader yourself, and The Ready is growing. What have been some of the challenges for you? And what have you learned personally about leadership and working ...more
... a founder and a leader yourself, and The Ready is growing. What have been some of the challenges for you? And what have you learned personally about leadership and working in this way with others? Aaron Dignan: This has been an interesting one for me. Because The Ready is the first time I've done this from s...more
...'re not quite there in this other area. And so I think I keep waiting for the moment when I can say, like, I'm done, you know, I don't have to be the leader anymore. And now it'll just work. But the reality is that does take some time and some care and some nurturing. And then, just in general - this ide...more
...ore. And now it'll just work. But the reality is that does take some time and some care and some nurturing. And then, just in general - this idea of leadership. Understanding, in what context someone is a leader, and what it means to have leadership in the system that is emerging all the time. I think that t...more
...es take some time and some care and some nurturing. And then, just in general - this idea of leadership. Understanding, in what context someone is a leader, and what it means to have leadership in the system that is emerging all the time. I think that there's still a lot of bias and narratives that we te...more
...d some nurturing. And then, just in general - this idea of leadership. Understanding, in what context someone is a leader, and what it means to have leadership in the system that is emerging all the time. I think that there's still a lot of bias and narratives that we tell ourselves about leadership being a ...more
... to have leadership in the system that is emerging all the time. I think that there's still a lot of bias and narratives that we tell ourselves about leadership being a permanent state. And so everybody's like, is this person a leader? Is that person a leader? As opposed to saying, is this person a leader in ...more
...there's still a lot of bias and narratives that we tell ourselves about leadership being a permanent state. And so everybody's like, is this person a leader? Is that person a leader? As opposed to saying, is this person a leader in this situation? And what about in another situation when they're not? So ...more
...as and narratives that we tell ourselves about leadership being a permanent state. And so everybody's like, is this person a leader? Is that person a leader? As opposed to saying, is this person a leader in this situation? And what about in another situation when they're not? So we've started playing wit...more
...leadership being a permanent state. And so everybody's like, is this person a leader? Is that person a leader? As opposed to saying, is this person a leader in this situation? And what about in another situation when they're not? So we've started playing with ideas of thinking about different skill domai...more
... they have mastery in that space. And so it creates leaderships, rather than this, like, well, this person's been here for five years. So they're the leader so I'll ask them about everything. There are definitely people who are very 'senior' at The Ready that you should not ask about certain things. And ...more
... page - even though maybe we wouldn't have talked about it that way before. Or sometimes we'll have a large enough group of like, you know, a top 40 leader group or something. We'll have three different subsets of that group, each with their own deck, who do the work and then compare. And the comparison ...more
...rage outcomes as our goals for change, we're just whittling off all the rich complexity that's going on. Whereas the cards will show us - this set of leaders thinks it's this, this set of leaders thinks it's that. It's not a competition, they're both right. And so then, how do we deal with that? How do we ...more
... we're just whittling off all the rich complexity that's going on. Whereas the cards will show us - this set of leaders thinks it's this, this set of leaders thinks it's that. It's not a competition, they're both right. And so then, how do we deal with that? How do we address the system in its richness? Wh...more

Buurtzorg and the power of self-managed teams of nurses

... other... Chila: Yeah, there is a good communication in the teams. Marian: We give each other feedback. Chila: That's also a problem sometimes in the self-leadership thing. Because if you cannot do that in a team, if it's not safe enough to talk with each other about mistakes or problems or whatever, then you can ...more
...da: But there are a lot of teams that have a lot of problems. Chila: Yes, of course, it is difficult. Marian: It's not possible that you have any one leader, everyone is the same. And when there is in a team a leader, then you have a problem. And when you have only busy people, then you have big problems....more
.... Chila: Yes, of course, it is difficult. Marian: It's not possible that you have any one leader, everyone is the same. And when there is in a team a leader, then you have a problem. And when you have only busy people, then you have big problems. It's good to have a balance between people who are busy or ...more
...e a problem. And when you have only busy people, then you have big problems. It's good to have a balance between people who are busy or quiet, and no leader. Chila: For some people, that's very difficult. They want to control, they have to let go, you have to put it on the table and then everybody can say...more
...nd they want to work in a more self-managed way. What advice would you give them about how to make it work? Chila: Communicate. Marian: Yeah. And no leadership. Everyone has same responsibility, Chila: And honesty. Trust. Transparency. Safety. If you have that together, you can do it. Marian: Everyone has th...more
...o think for themselves, they don't like it. Jolanda: We also had in the other team one person [like that]. She left, she couldn't do this. She needed leadership....more
...oach. That's different to a manager. They support you. They don't say you have to do this or that. But they support you. And that's what you need. No leadership. Marian: Never!...more
...ies in teams to solve. And sometimes they are not to be solved because there are people who don't see that they don't belong there. They want to be a leader and it doesn't work. Lisa Gill: And then what happens? Jolanda: Uh, they still have the problems. And it would be nice if that person who has the pro...more
...pisodes, I really recommend them. I've put the links in the episode description on the website. It's interesting, the advice the ladies give about no leadership. I can't be sure if that's just a language thing. Maybe they meant no management, you know, the kind of stereotypical top-down behaviours that we ass...more
...al top-down behaviours that we associate with managers anyway. In any case, I think my interpretation, or maybe my belief in general is that there is leadership in self-managing teams, but it's a chosen kind of leadership. It's a leadership where we all step into our own authority in different ways and it's d...more
.... In any case, I think my interpretation, or maybe my belief in general is that there is leadership in self-managing teams, but it's a chosen kind of leadership. It's a leadership where we all step into our own authority in different ways and it's dynamic. Its leaderful, I think....more
...ink my interpretation, or maybe my belief in general is that there is leadership in self-managing teams, but it's a chosen kind of leadership. It's a leadership where we all step into our own authority in different ways and it's dynamic. Its leaderful, I think....more

Nand Kishore Chaudhary from Jaipur Rugs on love, collective consciousness and self-management

...ions with you, and I've read articles, you come across as such a presence, you have this real warmth and love that emanates from you in terms of your leadership. And it strikes me that you have this very clear vision of of how this organisation should be, but also how life should be. So you have this remarkab...more
...e. So I'm curious to learn a little bit more about these philosophies that you feel passionate about. Where did these come from? How has your view of leadership been shaped? NK Chaudhary: Leadership is a journey, leaders are not selected. They are not nominated. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up...more
...t more about these philosophies that you feel passionate about. Where did these come from? How has your view of leadership been shaped? NK Chaudhary: Leadership is a journey, leaders are not selected. They are not nominated. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up in times of hardships when others sta...more
...ophies that you feel passionate about. Where did these come from? How has your view of leadership been shaped? NK Chaudhary: Leadership is a journey, leaders are not selected. They are not nominated. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up in times of hardships when others stay seated. Leadership i...more
...hese come from? How has your view of leadership been shaped? NK Chaudhary: Leadership is a journey, leaders are not selected. They are not nominated. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up in times of hardships when others stay seated. Leadership is not an occupation. It is not a job. Leadership i...more
...ney, leaders are not selected. They are not nominated. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up in times of hardships when others stay seated. Leadership is not an occupation. It is not a job. Leadership is a passion. And actually, it is a calling. In 1990 when I was about to move to Gujarat, to work w...more
...ted. Leaders transpire and they emerge. They rise up in times of hardships when others stay seated. Leadership is not an occupation. It is not a job. Leadership is a passion. And actually, it is a calling. In 1990 when I was about to move to Gujarat, to work with the tribal community, everybody in my communit...more
... just a matter of three or four years they started to respect me as a guide. It was then I realised that innocence and authenticity is the key for my leadership....more
...For you has it always been easy? I mean, what has your journey been with losing yourself in order to find yourself? Have you had painful moments as a leader and noticing your own blind spots or pitfalls? What has your journey been like? NK Chaudhary: I'm driven by the three things. The first is unconsciou...more
...we can only create the new future when we are mindful. So I think consciousness will be the way to bring that self-management. The more conscious the leaders, the more consciousness, self-awareness [there will be in the] staff - it will make a difference. Because the future lies in the present. So the more...more

Lisa Gill and Mark Eddleston celebrate 50 episodes of Leadermorphosis

...l I ended up, kind of by accident, in a learning and development, like a professional training company in London. And that was my portal really, into leadership development and organisational culture. And because it was new to me, I started just learning about it kind of furiously: consuming books and going t...more
...rough that, I discovered the more radical side of things and came across companies at the time like HCL, that were inverting traditional paradigms of leadership and I got excited about all that stuff. And then I decided to leave the corporate world and set up my own company with a very broad vision of trying ...more
... and then my consulting and coaching work started to move in that direction more specifically. And then I met Karin Tenelius the co-founder of 'Tuff Leadership Training' in January 2016 and learned about how she had been helping transform companies to become self-managing since the 90s, and she and I started...more
...rite a book together about the stories of ten or so companies she'd transformed and in the process of that I became a trainer with her company: 'Tuff Leadership Training'. And so nowadays it's become my world, entirely. It took a while to transition into that but I was always interested in how can we tap into...more
... need to change relationally? How do we need to change the way we relate to each other? Particularly those of us who are managers or who have been in leadership positions, but also those of us who haven't - that there are these like shifts that need to happen in two directions. So using the case studies of th...more
...f guests: so not just people from Europe and North America, not just people who are white, not just people who are academics, not just people who are leaders of organisations, but people on the frontline, people who are doing it - to have a real mix. And so it's been really wonderful to do some more diggin...more
...till an emphasis on development. But that's also really hard to do. So no one has cracked this relational human stuff, mindset stuff - how to be as a leader, how to create that paradox of how to create environments where everyone is powerful, and and yet, at the same time, allowing for natural leadership ...more
...as a leader, how to create that paradox of how to create environments where everyone is powerful, and and yet, at the same time, allowing for natural leadership and hierarchies to emerge -that's really tricky and there's no magic pill for that. So I think that's also been something that's been confirmed time ...more
... - you're self-managing, and it's funny: For organisation A, could well be fatal for organisation B and I think that's quite frustrating, perhaps for leaders when they're chatting to people working in this space when it's: "Okay what do we do? How do we do it?" And we respond with: "Well, that depends." S...more
...ource that have followed on from the book. And he has some really wonderful questions for people to reflect on, particularly if you're a founder or a leader around: what's your personal purpose? Why is this interesting and important to you? And I also think if you aren't someone who has decision-making po...more

Margaret Heffernan on how to act our way out of the status quo trap

...ink about this blindspot, we have - the place from which we are operating. Especially from talking to a lot of people in organisations - particularly leaders - who are in theory up for experimenting or transforming. And they overestimate their ability to be empowering or up for the change that's going to c...more
...ng about their business. Every one of them always complains, and then they give me all the reasons why they can't do anything. But actually, you show leadership by trying, even if you don't succeed. I had a fantastic conversation with a young woman on Saturday. We were coming back from a conference together ...more
... and maybe getting used to the pleasure of complaining, where one always feels sort of self righteous as a victim rather than able to take risks as a leader....more
...Lisa Gill: Yes - I have learned that there seem to be two paradigms of leadership, or of working together. One is like kind of parent-child paradigm kind of traditional management paradigm. And there is a sort of safety and securit...more
...rama though. They get fixed with a lot of really good listening, and quite a lot of subtle negotiation. But because I work very closely with a lot of leaders, I do see this happening quite frequently. So I think the story that we tell ourselves - which is if I speak up, I'd get clobbered - it's an alibi f...more
...t happens if you do nothing, is nothing. What happens to your self esteem? Nothing very good. What happens to your notion of yourself as some kind of leader? Well, it lacks evidence. So I think you have to look at those two stories and think, which story do I want to be mine?...more
...Lisa Gill: Yes, that's very powerful. This makes me think about leaders in particular. What can we do to help create that kind of climate of psychological safety that is going to make people more likely to take that risk ...more
... 300,000 or 500,000 pounds worth of debt, I can't afford to be out of work for a day. So I think the first thing I would say is, it's important as a leader to recognise what you can and can't influence. And if you're in that kind of environment, which we may find ourselves in sooner than we think, people...more

Peter Koenig on source, money and consciousness

...of putting it that what you're describing, these three roles that the source plays, I think it can conjure up images again of the kind of charismatic leader or the sort of heroic leader, which is a sort of old paradigm now, a bit out of date I think. And actually, what Tom said is that it's more of a vuln...more
...e describing, these three roles that the source plays, I think it can conjure up images again of the kind of charismatic leader or the sort of heroic leader, which is a sort of old paradigm now, a bit out of date I think. And actually, what Tom said is that it's more of a vulnerable visionary, that there ...more
...Lisa Gill: Yeah, and I think that's been a key piece for me is understanding the inner work. I came across a term recently 'leader smithing', which I quite liked. 'Leader smithing', like, if you're a blacksmith, you know, you would always been in this lifelong process of honing y...more
...h, and I think that's been a key piece for me is understanding the inner work. I came across a term recently 'leader smithing', which I quite liked. 'Leader smithing', like, if you're a blacksmith, you know, you would always been in this lifelong process of honing your craft and this real commitment to co...more
...e things in life, etc., that comes to a limit at some point also. And then we turn towards what these other levels which you could describe, 'servant leadership,' (or they're given different kinds of terms), when purpose comes really into view, people start then to look, see the limit and come to look at what...more
...now how to create a culture of accountability that doesn't look like the things that we're trying to reject, we don't know what power or authority or leadership looks like, if not the things that we're trying to move away from. And so, there's a lot of people feeling stuck and confined I think, and I find tha...more
...nd you're ready to open it up to other people in your organisation. So that's what I would give as input to somebody looking at it. I've had business leaders come into my money seminars, from large organisations, and originally, rather naively, I thought, the next step is they'll be bringing this work into...more

Keith McCandless and Henri Lipmanowicz on acting your way into a new kind of organising with Liberating Structures

... dialogue about what are they going to do when they get back or whatever it is. And this was very revealing this story, just the interaction - so the leaders were doing their normal thing, you know - what is it that you need from us? What is it that you need from us? And you can see that all the frontline ...more
...ot up the courage and said, “Well, really, we don't need anything from you. Nothing. I think we just got what we need in this workshop”. And then the leaders sort of went - oh, my God, what's my job now? I'm no longer needed to be the boss. I no longer need to be the provider, the boss, the father, the pat...more
...sa Gill: Yeah. On that note, I think if we take a really practical example like strategy, which traditionally is, you know, a group of chosen few top leaders, maybe in a dark cave, working on a strategy, and then they kind of come out and 'ta-da' here it is. Keith McCandless: Get rid of the dark cave - I c...more
...ad and their faculty designer. We did a good job. And you know, they were getting started, and I'm there and just loving the energy of the school and leadership and students. We're about 90 minutes into a three day shindig workshop. And the two students who are with me, they get a feel for 1-2-4-All, and Impr...more

Pasteur Byabeza on transitioning to self-management at Davis College

...llege, and Akilah, was invited to transition into holacracy. That's how we disbanded the global cancer. We did away also with any formal or informal leadership roles or titles. So there are no more departments. All my colleagues were invited to work within one or more circles. So that's the process. ...more
...ed in hierarchies and is about yielding to authority and seeing all subordinates yielding to authority. You look at the African chiefs - traditional leaders who have absolute power - and I would say sometimes they're totalitarians, using the tools to manage and control people sometimes. I would say it was...more

Jorge Silva on horizontal structures and participatory culture at 10Pines

...Lisa Gill: I'm curious to know, what have you as a co-founder learnt in terms of being a leader in a company with no bosses? What have you found challenging? What have you found surprising? Jorge Silva: Well, yeah, it's an interesting question.....more
... alone - I need to validate my ideas and to validate things with others and to have a better approach or a complementary view of the problem. So as a leader, I think that it's really important to... have the opinions and the involvement of others. So I think that this is one of the things that I have lear...more