Culture

This feature only applies to episodes with transcripts, which is a small number at this time.

Bill Fischer and Simone Cicero on Haier and the entrepreneurial organisation

...uimin has put together… really it’s like a puzzle of great ideas, and strong approaches to work and life and everything that makes this crazy, unique culture. For example, it’s a great mix of some of the most interesting and important management thinkers from the West. Zhang Ruimin is such a big fan of Pe...more
...dual and his capability, with this kind of postmodern perspective that the Taoist thinking brings, you end up with this kind of crazy entrepreneurial culture. And this is really unique, I think — from my understanding this is not present in any other organisation that I that I’ve been able to engage with. ...more
... about you, it’s about all the other people that engage in the management and in the execution of the business vision. And so you tend to create this culture of having everybody at the same level, especially when everybody can engage with the knowledge. And when the knowledge and the ideas and the compens...more
...ke lots of money. So, you can be a kind of architect, a certain kind of attraction for the participants in your organisation — you kind of create the culture by designing these constraints. And this is something that is quite recurring. **I think, when you deal with really complex organisations, they’re m...more
...rselves. S Cicero: What I can say for you know, being in touch with people that have been hired lately, I see that there is such a now such a strong culture, that it is impossible that you end up working for Haier with a hierarchy or control perspective. It’s mathematically impossible. You won’t be at Hai...more
...ey can adjust the outside — which is the wrong way to go. S Cicero: Well if I can add just a couple of reflections more to the nuance of clashing of culture…so the West and the East… I think one interesting point of Haier when they take over existing companies… Zhang Rumin once said to me that they don’t ...more
...is, and to bring these ways of organising beyond just creating the next user experience. And I think it’s really going to be an interplay of European culture and Chinese culture, if we can really achieve it, you know, this sweet spot of these two cultures, trying to think about the organisation and the pur...more
...se ways of organising beyond just creating the next user experience. And I think it’s really going to be an interplay of European culture and Chinese culture, if we can really achieve it, you know, this sweet spot of these two cultures, trying to think about the organisation and the purpose of the organisa...more
...is about. B Fischer: When I listen to Simone, I agree with what he says completely. I think it’s kind of interesting that traditionally we have this culture in the West of being independent, and the culture in China in particular as being collective. And yet the behaviour that we’re seeing in Haier is, in...more
...gree with what he says completely. I think it’s kind of interesting that traditionally we have this culture in the West of being independent, and the culture in China in particular as being collective. And yet the behaviour that we’re seeing in Haier is, in a sense, almost the reverse of what we see in the...more
...roy the organisation not to not really to destroy bureaucracy only. I think Haier has been already accepting the idea that again, it’s a no bullshit culture — so they are really destroying the bureaucracy. They’re really on track to take bureaucracy out of the picture. To take out bullshit, pointless micr...more
...et? But to some extent, I can also see that in Haier, there are some interesting seeds of transcending the organisation, as I said. So, it’s the same culture that is about no bullshit, you know, making new customer experiences all the time, there is also the seedbed for the independence and interdependence...more
...d she says this is not going to give us many answers in terms of how we create sustainable corporations. But the question is really that this kind of culture — it’s not about giving you an answer — it’s much more about flowing with what the transition is going to be and creating an organisation that can co...more
...ea, at their own risk to some extent, I mean, it’s not a free ride — and see, and see if it would work or not. But I think the way in which the Haier culture works is that if you join the organisation, no matter whether you’re joining as a young, first time employee or mid-career transition…it comes as a b...more
...ous. It’s a very porous organisation that you can imagine as a kind of accelerator. You end up inside of this accelerator if you are attracted by the culture. You can be out in three months or…if there is this seat of leadership in yourself, and you have an overlap with the culture, you can easily be caugh...more
...you are attracted by the culture. You can be out in three months or…if there is this seat of leadership in yourself, and you have an overlap with the culture, you can easily be caught in this rapidly spinning machine and become a leader and create your micro-enterprise and get your enterprise to IPO in, yo...more
...o do it on a large scale it’s a matter of designing the right pieces, and putting the right pieces together — the services, and the supports, and the culture — so that this can really happen on a large scale. B Fischer: And, and so Lisa if you could go back to this person you mentioned in the aerospace in...more

Jorge Silva on horizontal structures and participatory culture at 10Pines

...r to be here. And thank you for introducing me. So I like to start talking with a game when I talk about 10Pines and how we see our business and the culture and company. And the game is about a fight with your thumbs. Lisa Gill: Yeah, thumb wars! Jorge Silva: And here it’s a really popular game when you...more
...notice? What would feel different? Jorge Silva: Well, in order to have an idea of how we work, I feel proud of three practices that summarise all the culture and how we see the management of the company. The first one is that we make decisions in a collaborative way. And we use concerns - like in Sociocrac...more
...Lisa Gill: On that note, you mentioned three key practices that make up your culture and the way that you're organised. I'm wondering what you're learning in terms of - not so much in terms of structures and processes - but in terms o...more
...se the people do the things, and there is no way to complain and to criticise, because it's real that you are part of the solution. So here we have a culture that we don't allow people to complain in terms of “well, I don't like that, I like that.” Because if you don't like something, if you see a problem ...more
...u fail, you have to be humble, otherwise you will not learn and people will not trust in you. So accountability is really important because we have a culture that we - in the bottom line - we have to be based on trust, so we worked really hard on trust and to create trust and to take care of trust because ...more
...and it's really hard to create that kind of context - and it's really easy to lose it. So one of the other aspects that is important in this kind of culture and in this kind of company is to take care of trust, you know - it's really important for us. And the last thing that I think we look for from peopl...more
...we have the first filter, then we have a first meeting where we understand their needs, we understand the expectations, we tell them how we work, our culture, all the all important things. And after that, if we are okay with that, we send them a technical exercise. They go to his or her house to work on t...more
...for people to work. But we have had some cases - and most of the time, they take like, I don't know, six months or a year to start understanding the culture that they don't have a boss, they have to be proactive - and they don't have to look for validation from the boss. But in the end, I think they under...more
... boss, they have to be proactive - and they don't have to look for validation from the boss. But in the end, I think they understand the idea and the culture, and it's interesting how people can change their behaviour when you change the context, right? And this is one of the best ideas that we can see her...more
...ilar way. And I know you have found a few, but you're hoping to find more. Do you think this way of working comes naturally or easily in terms of the culture in Argentina, for example? Jorge Silva: Well, I think that it's going to be the way of working in the future. So I think it's going to be natural in ...more
...s, but a lot of interesting people or people who are interested in these kinds of companies. And I think that we are working on creating this kind of culture here, and these kinds of organisations and companies here, at least in the IT industry. That is the industry that we are a part of. And yeah, we have...more
...s you to get feedback from your teammates. Who helps you to see your future and how to evolve in the company, and help you in terms of how to see the culture and how to understand the culture. What can you do or what you should do. It's like a personal coach. And as soon as you get into the company, you ch...more
...ammates. Who helps you to see your future and how to evolve in the company, and help you in terms of how to see the culture and how to understand the culture. What can you do or what you should do. It's like a personal coach. And as soon as you get into the company, you choose your gardener and it's going ...more

Pasteur Byabeza on transitioning to self-management at Davis College

...n we've had on the podcast. And I know when you and I spoke before you shared with me some reflections as a Rwandan on how certain aspects of African culture have either helped or made this transition more challenging. Could you share with listeners, what your take is on, you know, African culture and how ...more
... African culture have either helped or made this transition more challenging. Could you share with listeners, what your take is on, you know, African culture and how that has played a part in this shift? Pasteur Byabeza: That's a great question. I would say that our thought is that the role of culture in m...more
...ican culture and how that has played a part in this shift? Pasteur Byabeza: That's a great question. I would say that our thought is that the role of culture in management is poorly understood. People should know that values, norms and beliefs derived from certain group of people will definitely affect the...more
...d beliefs derived from certain group of people will definitely affect the functioning of organisation they are operating - within that place, or that culture, or that environment. So, let me discuss the influence of African culture on organisation transformation. First of all, I need to clarify that Davis ...more
...functioning of organisation they are operating - within that place, or that culture, or that environment. So, let me discuss the influence of African culture on organisation transformation. First of all, I need to clarify that Davis College can rightly call itself this - because it is an African organisati...more
...ced - when people in an organisation are accustomed to receiving orders and instructions about what to do from their managers, because it is in their culture, it takes them time to get used to taking the lead and getting things done without waiting on anyone to tell them what to do. You would see a situat...more
...ou have the answer to that, but it's just interesting to me. Pasteur Byabeza: Yes, I wouldn't say that it's a result of colonisation, because African culture existed before colonisation. Actually, colonisation came in and, brought in some new thinking, new structure, some things we didn't actually know fro...more
...ctually, colonisation came in and, brought in some new thinking, new structure, some things we didn't actually know from outside. Traditional African culture is rooted in hierarchies and is about yielding to authority and seeing all subordinates yielding to authority. You look at the African chiefs - trad...more
...her than division. Respect of elders and superiors. And, you know, sharing everything you see, - that's something that is also deeply rooted into our culture. And I believe, when you mentioned things like united teamwork, solidarity, they work a lot in favour of the self management paradigm....more
... sharing that. It's interesting. I'm learning more and more as I speak to people on the podcast that there are so many different dimensions - and the culture that you start from totally influences the journey and how you see the journey. So I'm curious to hear from you, what have been some of the biggest c...more
...ners, and some other people on this journey of discovering new ways of working together. The first one is it's very important to set up institutional culture that fosters self management. For our kids, we have this amazing cultural code - which is built around seven pillars. I can mention three of them. Th...more
... change. Human beings - we change, we evolve. You know, that's growth mindset. We believe we can learn new ways of doing things and that comes from a culture of embracing growth mindset. Another one is drawing the owl. That's our terminology, but it means getting things done and learning as you go. So thos...more

Amy Edmondson on psychological safety and the future of work

...e can exercise leadership that makes your life at work better. So what managers can do is exercise more leadership, and exercise leadership over the culture or the climate. To me, the most important thing they can do is just start out by just being more open themselves, being more open about the challenge...more
... because you mentioned a couple of times this term ‘climate’ and I know that it’s not that widely used. And I think sometimes people conflate it with culture. What would you say are the distinctions between culture and climate and why is that important? AE: It’s not like one is a table and the other is a ...more
...te’ and I know that it’s not that widely used. And I think sometimes people conflate it with culture. What would you say are the distinctions between culture and climate and why is that important? AE: It’s not like one is a table and the other is a chair — there is some overlap in the concepts. Culture is...more
...en culture and climate and why is that important? AE: It’s not like one is a table and the other is a chair — there is some overlap in the concepts. Culture is more enduring and more holistic. So it’s perfectly reasonable to say: “What’s the culture at Harvard Business School?” We tend to think of culture...more
...ther is a chair — there is some overlap in the concepts. Culture is more enduring and more holistic. So it’s perfectly reasonable to say: “What’s the culture at Harvard Business School?” We tend to think of culture as a set of taken for granted beliefs and assumptions about what’s appropriate behaviour aro...more
...Culture is more enduring and more holistic. So it’s perfectly reasonable to say: “What’s the culture at Harvard Business School?” We tend to think of culture as a set of taken for granted beliefs and assumptions about what’s appropriate behaviour around here. And you could answer the question: “What’s the ...more
... as a set of taken for granted beliefs and assumptions about what’s appropriate behaviour around here. And you could answer the question: “What’s the culture like at Harvard Business School?” and there would be a lot of very useful information in that answer. But if you said: “What’s the, say, psychologica...more
...o the climate is something that’s a bit more ephemeral, like the weather. It’s what I feel I can do right here. And it’s gonna be consistent with our culture — like if there are things our culture absolutely says are just never done, it’s not gonna be done in this little group here either. But the climate ...more
... more ephemeral, like the weather. It’s what I feel I can do right here. And it’s gonna be consistent with our culture — like if there are things our culture absolutely says are just never done, it’s not gonna be done in this little group here either. But the climate can be changed overnight sometimes. Let...more
...experience like that — or you join a new team. Boom! Totally different climate. You absolutely feel you can roll up your sleeves and be yourself. The culture is more enduring and just more general. ...more
...ay that is focused on the customers’ needs and what we are trying to produce to meet those needs. It can’t be focused on change for change’s sake, or culture change for culture change’s sake. Or even, as important as this is, it can’t just be focused on employee experience. Because I think we are all inher...more
...on the customers’ needs and what we are trying to produce to meet those needs. It can’t be focused on change for change’s sake, or culture change for culture change’s sake. Or even, as important as this is, it can’t just be focused on employee experience. Because I think we are all inherently excited about...more

Aaron Dignan on being complexity conscious and people positive

... it. And I think that we need to get to a tipping point. I mean, we need to see 10% or 20% of organisations thinking and acting this way in order for culture to really change. And so to me, this was like - can I accelerate that? Can I put some, some oomph behind that?...more
...ow, in systems theory, there are lots of different kinds of systems - simple systems, complicated, complex, chaotic, disordered, etc. We really, as a culture, think about everything as complicated. So, you know, a watch is complicated, an engine is complicated. They can be fixed, they can be predicted, the...more
...ney. So I think that's a hard one to sort of break the habit on. Beyond that, it's really just about getting what you give. I mean, we have a remote culture. And we've learned a lot that if you don't care for the garden - if everybody just goes back and cooks dishes with vegetables - then you lose somethi...more
... how do people get counsel? How do they apprentice to different skills and different stories? How do they get feedback? So having a generous feedback culture is an investment that matters. Creating products and services and productizing things is an investment. So, you know, we created these tension and pr...more
...k of practice cards, which are, you know, things that we can do differently. So, you know, the one that we featured today online was 'stop hiring for culture fit, and start hiring for what's missing from the culture', which is actually something that Adam Grant talks a lot about. So the idea with the card...more
...an do differently. So, you know, the one that we featured today online was 'stop hiring for culture fit, and start hiring for what's missing from the culture', which is actually something that Adam Grant talks a lot about. So the idea with the cards was people struggle for both the safety and just the awa...more

Nand Kishore Chaudhary from Jaipur Rugs on love, collective consciousness and self-management

... perhaps the mindset change isn't possible or that they're too ingrained. So as you grow as an organisation, how do you think you can keep alive this culture? As new people come in, how can you keep the culture sustained? And keep this respect for, as you say, this idea that the frontline is king? NK Chaud...more
...ey're too ingrained. So as you grow as an organisation, how do you think you can keep alive this culture? As new people come in, how can you keep the culture sustained? And keep this respect for, as you say, this idea that the frontline is king? NK Chaudhary: To begin with in 2017, I had an intuition and c...more
...ed Krishna there and a lot of people have said to me that self-management isn't possible in countries like India, where there's a strong hierarchical culture. I'm curious, what do you think about that? What is your take? Is that true? Is that a myth? NK Chaudhary: Hypocrisy is the biggest problem in our co...more
...Lisa Gill: Do you feel like you will be able to pass on this legacy after you're gone? Do you think there's a strong enough culture in Jaipur Rugs that it can survive and flourish even without you? NK Chaudhary: Yes, I want to tell you: yesterday when I was outside Jaipur, and I w...more

Margaret Wheatley on leadership and Warriors for the Human Spirit

...ow we're going to protect people, and try and lead as best we can in an environment in which you have to be revolutionary, you have to be counter the culture of greed and efficiency and numbers, and artificial intelligence and standardised processes - you have to take a stand. So it's a different level - i...more
...hat we can be in these places that provoke and trigger us and be of service. So the whole meaning of being a warrior, which is historically, in every culture, there are warriors, a few people who train who are incredibly disciplined, and who are there to protect. Now, in some cases, they're protecting the ...more
...s is connecting to other, now I would say other islands. At the time, we thought, if we connected well enough, we could create the emergence of a new culture, a new society, at another level, I no longer believe that's possible - we have to get through this period of destruction. And then perhaps, but who ...more
...- 'I'm just gonna do it'. And there's a lot more energy and a lot more creativity, but it's a hard sell. You know, we're so driven by hope. Our whole culture is driven by goals and hopes and expectations. So, I would say those three things are what I find most significantly difficult for people to embrace....more

Frederic Laloux with an invitation to reclaim integrity and aliveness

...did it, and so on. There’s part of it that is just go out and do it. Have you always wanted to try something? I think there’s something weird in our culture around the level of permission seeking that has to do with the fact that from the youngest age, you know, we’ve had to ask permission to leave the di...more
...nd everything has an individual external component — my actions, my behaviours — that you can actually see and measure. An inner collective component culture, right, this thing that we all share in our heads and an external collective component, which is all structures and systems. And so when you tell me...more
...’re shielded from that reality, then yeah, most likely they won’t make any make any decisions. So it’s interesting. You can talk about the corporate culture and train people for skills, but often I do look at some of the structures where people tend to default to “Oh, yeah, but you know, we should retrain...more

Lisa Gill and Mark Eddleston celebrate 50 episodes of Leadermorphosis

...arning and development, like a professional training company in London. And that was my portal really, into leadership development and organisational culture. And because it was new to me, I started just learning about it kind of furiously: consuming books and going to conferences. And through that, I disc...more
...e try this?", and then just try it. And the thing with Liberating Structures I like is that it's changing by habits rather than trying to do some big culture change. So I think Liberating Structures are a really good active thing you can do. And meetups of course, like Reinventing Work - find a Reinventin...more

Miki Kashtan on the three shifts needed for self-managing organisations to thrive

...at system, if you don't have clear agreements about how you handle conflict, you're going to inherit the way that conflict is handled in the dominant culture. You know, some of the ways that we tend to handle conflict in at least the global north societies is avoid, erupt, suppress, erupt again, quit or fi...more
...hey come into the mosque? Or do they not come into the mosque? It wasn't presented as a problem of how do we honour them, invite them to partake in a culture in a way that also honours everybody's sensitivities? That is a problem statement that lends itself to a solution. And they found a solution. They we...more

Peter Koenig on source, money and consciousness

...and things don't get done and there's this sort of shadow stuff going on, but we can't quite put a name on it and we don't quite know how to create a culture of accountability that doesn't look like the things that we're trying to reject, we don't know what power or authority or leadership looks like, if n...more

Keith McCandless and Henri Lipmanowicz on acting your way into a new kind of organising with Liberating Structures

...g a PowerPoint presentation, while I'm telling you my answer. I'm actually flipping my answer into a question that we're all going to explore. In our culture, businesses, primarily Western, well, just let's just say the way we currently organise - that makes you look a little disorganised, a little bit lik...more